2018-10-11 / Community News

Open Stage

By Ed Kliman

This week marks a modest beginning, as all weeks usually do. In this particular instance, your hometown newspaper is venturing out into new territory with this column and your occasionally-humble correspondent by launching our podcast of Open Stage. Click the link below to listen in.


https://drive.google.com/open?id=16qwoHp8Kp-VlB6ryUG6AtZ1i_YRbFNho

What, exactly, is this podcast thing and why, exactly, should you care? Glad you asked, pull up a barstool and let me tell you. Oh, and I’ll tie this in to my great grandfather in just a few moments, too.

Every week, this column will be available as an audio file – an Mp3 – via a link you’ll find on the Facebook website of your hometown newspaper as well as at OpenStagePodcast.com. You can listen on your computer, smart phone or other device including your car stereo. It will usually be about 20 minutes long and – besides me reading this column - will include music you just can’t get anywhere else unless it’s music of mine that normally sells for $1 a song on iTunes, Amazon, Google, etc. The podcast – including the music – is free, by the way.

Why? Because the printed word is what we do and the printed word’s relationship with humans is changing drastically and in front of our eyes. We are living through the early years of the Information Age, which will easily equal the introduction of fire, steam, bronze and electricity to our benighted race. Your hometown newspaper is evolving along with the tools that are available to it. We invite you to be a part of all this by visiting us online, commenting on what we’re doing and suggesting things you’d like to hear.

As to the connection to my great grandfather: My grandmother grew up on a medicine show wagon traveling with her parents as they peddled patent medicines in what was then known as Indian Territory before it became the state of Oklahoma in 1907. When they pulled into town, my grandmother and great grandmother immediately went to work putting on a small show by singing and dancing in the streets. When they drew a crowd – or even if they didn’t – my great grandfather went to work selling elixirs and cure-alls from the wagon.


My grandmother grew up as a traveling singer on a wagon like this My grandmother grew up as a traveling singer on a wagon like this While some might point out that your faithful correspondent at least came by the job of selling snake oil honestly, I would venture that this contrast confirms what I was saying about the changing nature of the relationship between humans and that greatest of achievements – the printed word. There is as much distance and difference between my great grandfather’s business hustle and the TV advertising you see from the pharmaceutical industry as there is between Gutenberg’s printing press and modern electronic communications.


My grandmother and her parents never had these kind of tools to work with. Hi-definition sound and sensitive mics were not common in her day. My grandmother and her parents never had these kind of tools to work with. Hi-definition sound and sensitive mics were not common in her day. The verities remain eternal, only the messenger changes.

Return to top


Digital Edition

2018-10-11 digital edition
 













Today's Special Links