Digital Edition

2011-10-06 digital edition

Special Sections

 


2011-10-06 / General Stories

THEY SAID IT

(Life Lessons from Hospice Patients)


Stacy’s only in her thirties, but she’s lived in a nursing home for over a decade. She doesn’t have good control over her arms and legs. She gets around in a makeshift wheelchair of PVC pipe and cushions, designed to give her more room and flexibility. You can tell by looking in her eyes and conversing with her that she’s suffered a severe brain injury. When I visit, she’s usually somewhere around the front lobby. She always breaks out in a Stacy’s only in her thirties, but she’s lived in a nursing home for over a decade. She doesn’t have good control over her arms and legs. She gets around in a makeshift wheelchair of PVC pipe and cushions, designed to give her more room and flexibility. You can tell by looking in her eyes and conversing with her that she’s suffered a severe brain injury. When I visit, she’s usually somewhere around the front lobby. She always breaks out in a “I Sure Do Love You, Guy.”

huge grin when she sees me coming.

“Hey, Stacy,” I’ll say.

“Hey, guy!” she’ll say (she’s never been able to master “Gary”). “You know what? I sure do love you, guy.”

Stacy tells me she loves me at least ten times during each visit. She always seems to be smiling. She’s so enjoyable to be with.

Her teenage years were horribly traumatic. She struggled greatly and became severely depressed. One night she tried to take her own life,.a gunshot to the head. Somehow she survived, and here she was.

After I heard her story, I went back to the lobby and hugged her. She smiled, wrapped her arms around me and said, “You know what? I sure do love you, guy!”

I looked into her eyes and saw nothing but peace and contentment.

“I love you too, Stacy,” I said.

“Ha!” she exclaimed. “I love you more!”

Gary Roe is the Chaplain of Southern Care Hospice and is interim Minister at First Baptist Church in Lexington

Return to top

 













Today's Special Links